Traits of a good preschooler teacher

Teaching preschool requires a combination of education, experience, and certain intangible qualities. While education and experience will come with time and hard work, you may already have some of the necessary traits it takes to become a great preschool teacher.


You think children are fascinating
The number one characteristic of a great preschool teacher is someone who is fascinated by children and finds joy in being around them. Are you interested in what little kids say? Do you enjoy their wild imaginations? Are you curious about the learning behind their chatter? Do they make you laugh?


You have lots of patience
This doesn’t necessarily mean you smile serenely when people cut you off in traffic. Think specifically of your patience level with children or other beings you don’t expect to move at your pace.


Teachers must be optimistic


Teachers must possess an optimistic outlook,” Baharian says. “Their interactions will play an integral part in helping young children develop confidence and positive self-image.”


Creativity
This includes the artistic creativity you might employ in making crafts, music, or recipes. But it also includes the creativity to problem solve and brainstorm new approaches. Do you thrive with unexpected challenges? Are you able to explain things in more than one way?

You don’t know the meaning of “too enthusiastic”
Are you balancing work, family, and friends, in addition to thinking about going back to school? Are you the one people call for help—not because you aren’t busy, but because you meet tasks with enthusiasm?

Preschool teachers maintain a positive learning environment by being enthusiastic about kids, learning, and teaching. Children can tell when you don’t want to be there.

You support parents

Strong preschool teachers understand that parents and teachers are allies. They meet any conflicts or confusions with rock-solid communication.

Teaching preschool requires a combination of education, experience, and certain intangible qualities. While education and experience will come with time and hard work, you may already have some of the necessary traits it takes to become a great preschool teacher.


You think children are fascinating


The number one characteristic of a great preschool teacher is someone who is fascinated by children and finds joy in being around them. Are you interested in what little kids say? Do you enjoy their wild imaginations? Are you curious about the learning behind their chatter? Do they make you laugh?


You have lots of patience
This doesn’t necessarily mean you smile serenely when people cut you off in traffic. Think specifically of your patience level with children or other beings you don’t expect to move at your pace.


Teachers must be optimistic


Teachers must possess an optimistic outlook,” Baharian says. “Their interactions will play an integral part in helping young children develop confidence and positive self-image.”


Creativity


This includes the artistic creativity you might employ in making crafts, music, or recipes. But it also includes the creativity to problem solve and brainstorm new approaches. Do you thrive with unexpected challenges? Are you able to explain things in more than one way?

You don’t know the meaning of “too enthusiastic”
Are you balancing work, family, and friends, in addition to thinking about going back to school? Are you the one people call for help—not because you aren’t busy, but because you meet tasks with enthusiasm?

Preschool teachers maintain a positive learning environment by being enthusiastic about kids, learning, and teaching. Children can tell when you don’t want to be there.

You support parents

Strong preschool teachers understand that parents and teachers are allies. They meet any conflicts or confusions with rock-solid communication.

When you see disagreements at work or home, are you the mediator? Do you try to understand both sides of the story before making up your mind? Do you feel sympathy for frazzled parents in the grocery store? You might be well equipped to be a supportive teacher.

Teachers are extra encouraging


Do you understand the strength of a supportive word right when it is needed most—like urging a friend to go after a promotion or leaving a supportive note for a coworker? Teaching preschool requires those same encouraging traits. Children thrive when they have a compassionate hand guiding them in the right direction.

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